Sierra 

CASTLETON-SCHODACK GIRL SCOUTS 

 

DIAMOND STRONG

“Diamond Strong” is a Girl Scout Gold Award Project that combines Sierra’s passion for softball with an important social justice issue, promoting the healthy development of young women through participation in sports.  The project entails hosting a softball player development clinic in the Schodack Central School District with the assistance of local and college coaches.  It also includes addressing safety issues and field improvements on the Maple Hill Varsity Softball field.

 

GOING FOR THE GOLD

According to the Girl Scouts of the USA website the Girl Scout Gold Award is the highest and most prestigious award a Girl Scout may earn.  The Gold Award sets the foundation for the leadership skills, organizational skills, and sense of community and commitment needed for a lifetime of active citizenship.  It fulfills a need within a girl's community, creates change, and hopefully, is something that becomes ongoing.

The project is more than a good service project it must encompass organizational, leadership, and networking skills.  After fulfilling several pre-requisites, including earning the Silver Award, eighty hours is the suggested minimum hours for achieving the Gold Award. 

 

SOFTBALL AND SOCIAL JUSTICE

According to a Women’s Sports Foundation Report, “Her Life Depends on It II,” evidence-based research links sports and physical activity to the health and well-being of American girls and women.  It confirms that regular physical activity and sports provide the critical foundation that allows girls and women to lead healthy, strong, and fulfilled lives.

“Her Life Depends on It II”emphasizes that the gender gap in physical activity widens when traced across grade levels.  As girls get older they are less likely to engage in high rates of physical activity (five days or more a week), while more boys remain highly involved with physical activity from childhood through high school.  The reports suggests that girls get involved with sports for many reasons, including self-image, body-image, peer support, parental encouragement, presence of role models and cultural supports.  Girls and their families need program resources, safe venues, and opportunities to participate in school and community sports programs.   

 

"It is not fair to ask of others what you are unwilling to do yourself."  

--Eleanor Roosevelt